Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/55654
Type of publication: research article
Type of publication (PDB): Straipsnis kitose duomenų bazėse / Article in other databases (S4)
Field of Science: Etnologija / Ethnology (H006)
Author(s): Gustaitienė, Asta
Title: Hansas Christianas Andersenas ir folklorinė pasaka
Other Title: Hans Christian Andersen and the folkloric tale
Is part of: Tautosakos darbai. Vilnius : Lietuvių literatūros ir tautosakos institutas., 30 (2005)
Extent: p. 218-233
Date: 2005
Keywords: Aukso amžiaus tradicija;Stebuklas;Pasakos pabaiga;Dramatizmas;Pasakojamasis stilius
Abstract: On the basis of numerous academic studies, referable to this thematical paradigm, the author of the article reveals connections of the small prose by H. C. Andersen with the folkloric tale. One of the tendencies of the Danish golden age (1800–1850) is pointed out, namely, that of studying and popularizing the folk tales, as well as encouraging creation of the literary ones. Major attention is devoted in the article to the analysis and evaluation of seven tales by H. C. Andersen composed on the basis of folk tales. These 7 literary tales, i.e. The Tinder Box, Jack the Dullard, The Wild Swans, The Traveling Companion, What the Old Man Does Is Always Right, Little Claus and Big Claus,The Swineherd, are analyzed extensively. Analysis and comparison of extracts from one of these compositions, i.e. The Swineherd (Svinedrengen) and the folk tale The Conceited Maiden (Den stolte jomfrue) are also presented. Having considered all the small prose by H. C. Andersen, i.e. 156 compositions, his attitude to certain conventions typical for the folkloric tale, is highlighted. Interactions of H. C. Andersen’s work with the folk tales are bi-directional. During the early period of his creativity, while composing the literary tales H. C. Andersen directly followed patterns of the folkloric tale, whereas later variants of the tales created by H. C. Andersen himself started spreading and were told as folk tales. In this respect, tales The Traveling Companion and What the Old Man Does Is Always Right became especially popular. H. C. Andersen consciously used many conventions typical for the folkloric tales, e.g. the magical numbers, the stereotypical nonindividualized characters, the beginning formulae (“Once upon a time”, “Once in a village”, etc.), and the unspecified place of action, yet distancing himself from the typical ending formulae of the folkloric tales, as well as from their habitual happy endings, applying deep psychological insight instead. [...]
Internet: http://www.llti.lt/lt/td30
Affiliation(s): Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas
Appears in Collections:Universiteto mokslo publikacijos / University Research Publications

Files in This Item:
marc.xml9.97 kBXMLView/Open

MARC21 XML metadata

Show full item record
Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats
Export to Other Non-XML Formats


CORE Recommender

Page view(s)

15
checked on Mar 30, 2021

Download(s)

10
checked on Mar 31, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.