Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12259/40193
Type of publication: research article
Type of publication (PDB): Straipsnis Clarivate Analytics Web of Science / Article in Clarivate Analytics Web of Science (S1)
Field of Science: Filosofija / Philosophy (H001)
Author(s): Donskis, Leonidas
Title: On the boundary of two worlds: Lithuanian philosophy in the twentieth century
Is part of: Studies in East European Thought. Dordrecht : Kluwer academic publ., 2002, Vol. 54, iss. 3
Extent: p. 179-206
Date: 2002
Keywords: Culture;Philosophy of culture;Identity;Nationalism;Philosophy of history;Soviet Marxism
Abstract: Modern Lithuanian philosophy originated as aresponse to the questions formulated in Russianphilosophy – religious, moral, and social.Later it turned to Continental Europeanphilosophy, preoccupying itself with German andFrench existentialism, hermeneutics, andphenomenology. Yet the loss of independentpolitical and intellectual existence Lithuaniaexperienced for five decades isolated andmarginalized the then lively and promisingintellectual culture. In the 1980s, Lithuanianphilosophy started recovering and reorientingitself, again, to Western currents of moderntheoretical thought. Drawing on the example ofmodern Lithuanian philosophy, the articlepresents a detailed historical overview of whatmight be termed the East-Central European routeto political and cultural modernity
Internet: https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1015916105670
Affiliation(s): Politikos mokslų ir diplomatijos fakult.
Vytauto Didžiojo universitetas
Appears in Collections:Universiteto mokslo publikacijos / University Research Publications

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